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Full text of "Yearbook"

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As we look back on our four years in college, we relive many experiences. 
How well we remember our trials as Freshmen . . . our confidence as Sophomores 
. . . our expectations as Juniors . . . our triumphs as Seniors. 





Time dims our recollection of faces and events, though the fond memories 
are locked within our hearts. Let this book be a key to our memories. 





Introducing 



Administration 






DR. DENNIS C HALEY 



To the Members of the Class of 1952: 

It gives me great pleasure to extend to you my sincere congratulations upon the suc- 
cessful completion of your college course. You are now joining the Alumni of the Teachers 
College of the City of Boston, which has established an enviable record in the preparation of well- 
qualified teachers. I am confident that your achievements in your chosen profession will prove 
you worthy of carrying on the great traditions of your Alma Mater. 

The world which you are entering is shadowed by the ever present danger of global 
war. As teachers, you will bear the heavy responsibility of training children to face the problems 
that will confront them in a society so threatened and of inspiring them to work for the establish- 
ment of an enduring peace. 

May God give you strength and courage in attempting so great a task and grant you 
success and happiness in its accomplishment. 

Dennis C. Haley 
Superintendent of Public Schools 



J-& Ike /jy^e^L(ient auJi er^ acuity : 



During the past four years, we of the graduating 
class have come to know the President and faculty members 
very well. They have done a great deal for us, much more than 
was their obligation. It is through them that we have come to 
graduate. We have seen them display never-ending stores of 
understanding, patience, and co-operation. By doing so they 
have set a wonderful example for us to follow. Our association 
with them has resulted in more than an accumulation of facts; 
it has given us a valuable cultural background and a broad insight 
into life. 

I should like to take this opportunity to represent 
our class in saying, "Thank you, all, thank you very much. 
We shall never forget all that you have done for us." 

John J. Sherry, Jr. 
President of the Senior Class 




MATH AND SCIENCE 
DEPARTMENT 

Sitting: Miss Jefferson, Miss Eaton, 
Miss Quirk, Dr. Lynch, Miss O'D'oherty 
Standing: Mr. Caputo, Mr. Ryan, Dr. 
McCarthy, Mr. Quinn 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS DEPARTMENT 

Mr. Ventura, Mr. Staebner, Mr. Young, 
Mr. Walker, Mr. Hartnett 



ENGLISH DEPARTMENT 

Sitting: Dr. Madden, Miss Brennan, 
Dr. Burnce, Miss Martell 
Standing: Miss Gaffey, Dr. Collins, 
Dr. Marnell; Mr. Tyrell 



LIBRARIAN AND SECRETARIES 

Miss Leary, Miss McCarthy, Mrs. Barry, 
Miss Wadsworth 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Sitting: Miss Sullivan, Miss Bulger' 
Miss Donahue, Miss Kallen, Miss Trom- 
mel", Miss Kenney, Miss Fitzgerald 
Standing: Mr. Powderly, Mr. Dungan, 
Mr. Read, Mr. Conners, Dr. Gerry 



GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY 
DEPARTMENT 

Sitting: Miss Given, Miss Driscoll 
Standing: Mr. O'Brien, Mr. Sullivan, 
Mr. Regan, Mr. Aherne 



LANGUAGE, ART, AND MUSIC 
DEPARTMENT 



Ferr 



Mi: 



Sitting: Miss Barr, Mis 

Cannata, Miss Smith 

Standing: Miss Gartland, Mr. Bertolli, 

Miss O'Brien 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Sitting: Miss Donovan, Miss Armstrong 
Standing: Mr. Sullivan, Miss Farrell 





Introducing 



Settlors 








a^ 




Lcet^ 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



John J. Sherry, Jr. 
Joan M. Morrissey 
Marie T. O'Connell 
James A. Crowley 



{ is } 



THOMAS J. AGATHOPOULOS, 

27 Ransom Rd., Brighton 

Councillor I 

Welfare Club Treasurer II 

Debating Club I 

Industrial 

Not exactly loquacious . . . a sudden spark ex- 
changing opinions . . . amenable to almost any- 
thing. 



ELLEN M. AHERN 

3 Howes St., Dorchester 

Art Club I, II, III, IV 
Councillor III, IV 
Drama Club I 
Music Club I 



Elementary 

Violets and spring . . . softly insistent . 
wistful grace . . . intelligently silent, Ellen. 



MARGARET F. AMBROSE 

15 Cornell St., Roslindale 

Music Club I, II, III, IV 
Chalkdust II, III 
Lampas Section Editor 
Drama Club IV 

Elementary 

Irish and elfish . . . music and sports do mix . . 
always ready to have a go, wot? . . . the unquench- 
able jester, Mike. 




'52 



'52 




JOSEPH A. BAGLIONE 

36 Draper St., Dorchester 

Basketball — Co Captain I, Captain II, III, IV 
Baseball I, II, III, IV 



Certain sociability . . . artistic flourishes . . . 
time for just jesting . . . caftain oj the team. 



DOROTHY BERGER 

585 Norfolk St., Mattapan 

French Club II 
Literary Club I, IV 
Drama Club I, II, III 

Elementary 



Voice like plushy moss . . . a hit oj old lace . . . 
a modern tea . . . such feminine subtlety . . . 
gracious Dorothy. 



ROBERT C. BERTAZZONI 

592 Adams St., Dorchester 

Baseball Captain IV 
Debating Club I 
Music Club I 

Industrial 

Oh, so scholarly . . . a bit oj a sport . . . ready 
resources . . . an even keel . . . listens so well. 



DOMINIC J. BONANNO 

7 Auckland St., Dorchester 

Debating Club I, II 
Music Club 



What wit! . . . unexcitable . . . busy as the pro- 
verbial beaver . . . eternal activity. 



HELAINE R. BORNSTEIN 



Iola St., Dorchester 



French Club I 
Art Club I, II, III, IV 
Literary Club I, II, III 
Science Club I, II 
Drama Club I, II 

Elementary 

Why so serious . . . other things to do ■ 
ernism . . . eager and inquisitive. 



DOROTHY T. BORRIELLO 

309 Fuller St., Dorchester 

Music Club I, II, III 
French Club I, II, III 
Pres. French Club IV 
Literary Club II, III, IV 

Elementary 

Bright hair . . . buried temper . . .freshly femi- 
nine . . . a slowly forming smile . . . partly 
Parisian . . . calm as summer, Dotty. 




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T 



52 




MYRON H. BOY AJ IAN 

11 Bardwell St., Jamaica Plain 

Baseball I, II, III 
Debating Club I, II 



Jolly and jocular . . . gregarious tendencies . 
slightly optimistic . . . exudes exuberance 
faint the town. 



PHYLLIS L. BRANDES 



57 Dix St., Dorchester 



Literary Club I, II, III, IV 

Drama Club I, II 
French Club I 

Elementary 

Diminutive yet declarative . . . culinary con- 
quests . . . a notable curiosity . . . in a sensible 
swirl, Phyll. 



M. ELIZABETH BURNS 

54 Wilmington Ave., Dorchester 

Music Club I, II 

Science Club I, II 

Science Club, Secretary I, II 

Elementary 

Unquestionably alive , . . versatile and volatile 
. . . sports-wcman and mannequin . . . confusing 
Betty. 



NANCY E. BUSHEE 



587 Tremont St., Boston 



Science Club I, II, III, IV 

Spanish Club 
Literary Club IV 

Elementary 

Vicarious traveler to lands of intrigue . . . that 
gleam in her eye . . . Nancy the adventurous. 



PAUL E. CALLANAN 

12 Elko St., Brighton 

Councillor I, IV 

Drama Club I, II, III, IV 

Debating Club I 

Latnpas Business Manager 



Industrial 

That casual manner . . . projects galore . . . 
humor must prevail . . . act I, scene III . . . the 
purpose is there. 



MARY E. CHURCH 

11 Larkhill Rd., West Roxbury 

Councillor I, IV 
Drama Club I 
Art Club I, II, III, IV 
Asso. Editor, Chalkdust 
Art Editor, Chalkdust 

Kindergarten 

A burst of energy . . . work behind the scene . . . 
putters in the paint box . . . brusk and busy, 
Mary Beth. 




'52 



'52 




FRANCIS S. CHURCHILL 

27 Dawes St., Dorchester 

Basketball I 

Music Club I 

Drama Club I, II, III, IV 

Welfare Aide I 

Class Treasurer II 

Art Club II 

Section Councillor I, II, III 

Lampas Staff Art Editor 



Future plans . . . u 
. . . so in earnest , 
superlative sketches. 



'■uffled as motionless leaves 
. always volunteering . . . 



ELEANORE M. COAKLEY 

16 Owencroft Rd., Dorchester 

Music Club I, II 

Science Club I, II, 111,1V 

Treasurer Science Club I, II 

Elementary 

A wreathed smile . . . a faint fluster . . . tuneful 
fingers . . . diamond mine behind the eyes . . . 
sedate Eleanore. 



BERNICE J. COHEN 



7 Cleaves St., Roxbury 



French Club I, II, III, IV 
Drama Club I, II, III 



A bit of a hurry . . . rust and gold . . . slightly 
hesitant . . . Minute Waltz . . . listening in- 
tently. 



PATRICIA A. CONNOLLY 

65 Codman Hill Ave., Dorchester 

Literary Club I 
Drama Club I 
Music Club I 
Art Club II, III, IV 



Elementary 

A cautious charm 
hand in the fun . . 



, . . subdued vitality . . . a 
a smile and a sigh, Patricia. 



MARJORIE A. COTTER 

163 South St., Jamaica Plain 

Drama Club I 
Science Club I, II, III 
Literary Club II, IV 
S.G.A. — V.P. Ill 

Elementary 

Diversified dabbling . . . lend an ear . . . actually 
adventurous . . . a placid lake . . . steady now. 



PATRICIA A. COUGHLIN 

37 Waverly St., Roxbury 

Music Club I, II, Sec. 
Section Councillor IV 

Elementary 

That clear rich voice cant hide the sweetness 
beneath it . . . forever responsible . . . patrician 
Patricia. 




'52 



'52 




JEWELL H. COX 



Music Club II 
Science Club IV 
Literary Club IV 



48(1 Columbus Ave., Boston 



A cascade of laughter, with serenity beneath . . . 
light-hearted, level-headed Jewell. 



JEANNE M. CREAMER 

131 Elmer Rd., Dorchester 

Drama Club I, II 
Science Club II, III 
Section Councillor 
Class Sec. Ill 

Elementary 

Not Math! . . . Orbs like Stella Orion . . . say 
"hello" . . . mostly radiant . . . no sooner said than 
done. 



ROSEMARY D. CROSS 

2179 Centre St., West Roxbury 

Class Treas. I 

Chalkdust I, II, IV; Editor III 

Yearbook Co-editor-in-chief 

Elementary 

Condensed dynamo . . . Dixieland to Da/i . . . 
moonglow . . . "Saturday Review". .. Knights in 
armor. 



JAMES A. CROWLEY 



Perkins St., Jamaica Plain 

Music Club I, II 

Basketball Manager I, II, III, IV 

Senior Class Treas. IV 

Elementary 

Aware, alert, alive . . . right to the point . . . 
speed and steam . . . eager to teach, Jim. 



RITA H. CROWLEY 



25 LIndine Rd., Brighton 



Music Club I 

Art Club II, III; V. P. Ill 

Drama Club IV 

Lampas Staff, Business Manager 

Elementary 

An open book with binding of gold . . . magic 
wand/or woes . . . afresh burst of martial music 
. . . gayly Gaelic . . . made of music, Rita. 



ELIZABETH A. CUMMINGS 

6 Codman St., Dorchester 

Music Club I, II 

Science Club I, II, III, IV 

Drama Club III 

Elementary 

Small, slim, sprightly . . . that pixie look . . . 
concentrated effervescence . . .forever on a spring- 
board. 




'52 



'52 




PATRICIA ROSE DISKIN 

148 Stratford St., West Roxbury 

Literary Club I, II, III, IV; Pres. Ill 
Drama Club II, III, IV 

Elementary 

A light in her eye . . . intelligence in evidence 
. . . ever poised, Patricia. 



JOAN S. DONOGHUE 

55 Mercier Ave., Dorchester 

Music Club I, II, III, IV 
Science Club I 
Drama Club IV 

Elementary 

Carefree as dandelions . . . expressive smile . . . 
Austen-like wit . . . continually good natured. 



ANN M. DRISCOLL 



58 Whitten St., Dorchester 



Drama Club I, II 
Science Club II, III 



Study in repose . . . blues and violets . . . a con- 
soling shoulder . . . unswerving in purpose . . . 
Victorian elegance. 



ALICE C. DUFFY 



5 Drayton Ave., Dorchester 



Art Club I, II 

Yearbook Staff — Photography Committee 

Elementary 

An almost subdued recklessness . . . startlingly 
serious but seldom . . . devil-may-care Alice. 



VIRGINIA M. DUSEAU 

54 Kenwood St., Dorchester 

Music Club I, II, III, IV 
Science Club I 
Drama Club IV 



Soft like a nocturne . . . that calming influence 
. . . sensibly submissive . . . respectful ■ and 
reflective. 



LUCILLE M. ELLIS 



10 Rock Road, Mattapan 



Literary Club I, II Secretary, III, IV 

Chalkdust I 

Welfare Aide 

S. G. A. Convention representative III, IV 

Vice-president of the S. G. A. Ill 

President of the S. G. A. IV 




'52 



Elementary 

A soaring cyclone, with a steady center . . . 
decidedly open-minded . . . refreshing Lucille. 




'52 




JEAN M. EVANS 

101 King St., Dorchester 

Drama Club I 
Music Club II 
Science Club II, III 



Elementary 

Kind of wistful . . . a field of daisies . . . 
perpetual motion . . . long range planning . . . 
blithe spirit, Jean. 



LOUISE FABERMAN 



36 Spencer St., Dorchester 



Drama Club I 
Literary Club I, II, III 

Elementary 

A heart-exposing smile 
. . . pinwhee/s in July 



adept at an easel 
an edge on living. 



ADELAIDE G. FARRAH 

433 Shawmut Ave., Boston 

Music Club I, II, III, IV 
Drama Club I, Secretary 
Welfare Aide II 
Latnpas Staff, Photography Editor 

Elementary 

Cosmopolitan . . . burnt orange and rich yellow 
. . . dark glasses and hurried footsteps . . . 
sharps and flats. 



KATHLEEN V. FITZPATRICK 

10 Wait St., Roxbury 

Literary Club I, II, III, IV 
Secretary of the Literary Club III, IV 

Elementary 

Multi-channeled humor . . . mind of her own 
. . . actually an individualist . . . the finer 
things. 



MARY P. FLAHERTY 

78 Glendower Rd., Roslindale 

Music Club I, II, III, IV 
Science Club I 
Art Club I, II, III, IV 
Literary Club I 

Elementary 

Antiques and old world charm . . . five o'clock 
rush . . . elaborate centerpiece . . . friend in 
need. 



MARY F. FLYNN 



11 Enfield St., Jamaica Plain 



Drama Club I, II, IV 

Science Club I 

Art Club I, II, III, IV 

Elementary 

Shall we go . . . devilish grin . . . tresses and 
more tresses . . . attractive attire . . . mostly 
smiling. 




'52 



'52 




MARIE A. FOX 



62 Wycliff Ave., West Roxbury 



Music Club I 
Drama Club I 
Art Club II, III, IV 

Elementary 

Unrepressed mirth . 
good time had by all 



the eyes have it . '. . a 
. a way with friendships 



always amiable, Marie. 



NORMA B. FRANCIS 



Art Club I, II, III, IV 
Drama Club III 



Carefree as cartwheels . . 
ing . . . ever inquisitive 
paint brush. 



69 Cabot St., Roxbury 



your humor is show- 
. proficient with a 



TIMOTHY F. GALVIN 

28 Winter St., Dorchester 

Drama Club I 

Debating Club I, Vice-president II, President III 

Captain ot Basketball Team I 

Vice-president of Sophomore Class 

Athletic Association Secretary II, President III 

Elementary 



Force and fire . . 
do . . . sufficient 



"My friends — " . . . can 
in sports . . . mandatory 



LOUISE M. GEARY 

211 W. 5th St., South Boston 

French Club I 
Drama Club II 
Literary Club IV 



Speak up . 
preference . 



wondrous wardrobe . . . party 
capricious, quiet, questioning. 




CLARA L. GRANDOLFI 

93 Orleans St., East Boston 

Music Club I, II 

Science Club I, II, III 

Vice-President III 

Lampas Staff, Literary Editor 

Elementary 

Come back to Sorrento . . . righteously reckless 
. . . fund of resourcefulness . . . Clara, the 
obscure. 



JOHN M. GRAY 



Debating Club I 
Drama Club III, IV 



Indus tria 



5 Grafton St., Dorchester 



Absence of noise . . . kind words . . . done 
with ease . . . capable assistance. 




.52 



'52 




GENEVIEVE E. HALLISEY 

10 Lila Road, Jamaica Plain 



Drama Club II, HI 
Art Club IV 



Command and composure . . . a slip of gaiety 
. . . scheme in her eye . . . feet firmly fixed. 



KATHERINE L. HASTINGS 

70 Howitt Rd., West Roxbury 

Art Club I, II, III, IV 
French Club I 
Drama Club III 



Elementary 



Potent remarks . . 
way with a brush 
pricious Katie. 



devil in her eye 
. . in the swim . 



AGNES M. HAVERTY 

103 Roslindale Ave., Roslindale 



Art Club II, III, IV 
Drama Club III, IV 



Elementary 



Luminous dark eyes . . . clever on the canvas 
. . . exotic like orchids . . . can cook, too. 



27 Dunlap St., Dorchester 



SONA HOVAGIMIAN 

French Club I, II 
Elementary 



A quiet strength . . . eye-provoking eyes . . . 
soft spoken like sanctuaries . . . cornfields and 
bluegrass. 



JOHN F. HOWARD 

38 Boston St., South Boston 

Drama Club III, IV 

Industrial 

A vital awareness . . . consistently responsible 
. . . firm yet just . . . progressive pathways 
. . . ideas and ideals. 



PATRICIA H. HUGHES 

204 Bay State Rd., Boston 

Music Club III, IV 

Kindergarten 

Kindergarten capers . . . always allegro . . . 
have to hurry . . . so pleasant . . . etchings on 
the ivories. 





'52 



'52 




EILEEN T. KAVANAGH 

44 Montvale St., Roslindale 

Class President I 

Drama Club I, Treasurer, II, III, IV 

Art Club II, III, IV 

Athletic Association I, Treasurer, II, III, IV 

Lampas Staff, Section Editor 

Elementary 

Capable, considerate, co-operative . . . leaning 
toward laughter . . . administrative yet acquies- 
cent . . . the perfect lady, Kav. 



FRANCES M. KELLY 

247 Boston St., Dorchester 

Music Club I, II 
Drama Club I, II 
Art Club II, IV 



Elementary 



Rather elusive . . . 
quietly persistent . . 
calmness recaptured. 



scatters sympathy . 
. here yet elsewhere 



|OAN M. KELLY 



Drama Club I, II, III 
Science Club II 



; Alban St., Dorchester 



Marble features . . . fiery depths . . . a subtle 
savoir faire . . . that mannequin manner . . . 
upper hand on life. 



E. LORRAINE KISSLING 

365 Washington St., Brighton 

Drama Club I, II 
Science Club II 
Section Councillor III 



Kindergarten 

An appreciative laugh 
. . . mind for math . 
energy. 



. . deep discussions 
. hidden spurts of 



NORMA J. LaCOURSE 

667 La Grange St., West Roxbury 

Drama Club I 

Lampas Staff, Snapshot Editor 

Science Club II 

Art Club IV 

Welfare Aide III 

Kindergarten 

A consuming seriousness . . . that helping hand 
, . . carries a camera . . . quietly capable. 



CLAIRE T. LAWLOR 

1200 Commonwealth Ave., Allston 

Science Club II, III, IV 

Drama Club I, II 

Literary Club III, IV 

Lampas Staff, Photography Editor 

Elementary 

Eternally efficient . . . a sweetness all her own 
. . . refreshing refinement . . . portrait oj a 
lady. 




'52 



'52 




JUNE M. LEE 



153 Church St., West Roxbury 



French Club I, II, III, IV 

Drama Club I 

Literary Club II, III, IV 

Chalkdust III 

Lampas Staff, Advertising Manager 

Elementary 

Not really reticent . . . the eyes speak eloquently 
. . . deliberate and accurate . . . magnolia 
blossoms. 



MARY A. LESLIE 



• Wyman St., Jamaica Plain 



Section Councillor II, III, IV 
Music Club II 
Literary Club IV 

Elementary 

Ob so gentle . . . unique reliability . . . a 
ruffled parasol . . . genuine as broad daylight. 



ANNA E. LEWDANSKY 

39 Lothrop St., Brighton 

Literary Club IV 
Science Club IV 
Lampas Staff, Art Editor 

Elementary 

Greatness oj heart . . . duty-bound . . . a rare 
quietude . . . subtle gentility . . . constant as 
that first crocus. 



RALPH H. LEWIS 



39 Wrentham St., Dorchester 

Debating Club I 
Lampas Staff, Art Editor 

Industrial 

Expanding interests . . . travel around . . . 
inconspicuously helpful . . . always a question 
. . . not studying again! 



MARILYN LIPOFSKY 

20 Greenock St., Dorchester 

Literary Club I, II, III, IV 
Drama Club I, II, III, IV 
Science Club I 
Lampas Staff, Section Editor 

Special Class 

Glad to help . . . the social side . . . knows 
where she's going . . . the patience of . . . 
meteors and such. 



FRANCIS X. LYNCH 

10 Woodford St., Dorchester 

Drama Club I, 11 
Music Club I 
Science Club I, II 
Welfare Aide III 

Special Class 

Well-meaning prankster . . . unhurried pace 
. . . just joking . . . doubly deliberate . . . 
lighter side of things. 




'52 



*c 



52 




HUGH W. LYNCH 

43 Maxfield St., West Roxbury 

Drama Club I 

Music Club I 
Science Club I, II 
Welfare Aide III 



An all-inclusive talent . . . jet-propelled mind 
. . . some have it . . . casual, impenetrable, 
unconquerable. 



PHYLLIS M. Mac NEIL 

42 Keith St., West Roxbury 

Science Club I, II, III 
Drama Club I, II 
Literary Club II, III, IV 

Elementary 



One of the girls . 
certainly sociable . 
lilies of the valley. 



work to be done 
so understanding 



PATRICIA L. M ALLOY 



175 Newbury St., Boston 



Drama Club I 
Art Club I, II 
Science Club III, IV 

Kindergarten 

A bit fanciful . . 
blue morning glories 



love of the arts . 
. . subtle humor. 



GLORIA M. MARAGGIA 

6 Fernald Terrace, Dorchester 

Drama Club I, Vice-president II, III, IV 

Chalkdust I 

Art Club II, III, IV 

Elementary 

Energetic, eager, interested . . . marvelously 
mild-mannered . . . the indefatigable worker 
. . . sweet as cotton candy, Gloria. 



ARTHUR MARK 



10 Wolcott St., Dorchester 



Drama Club II, III 
French Club II, III, IV 
Literary Club III, IV 

Elementary 

Soul-searching . . . cramming culture . . . u 
believably busy . . . slightly skeptical . . . 
slave to the stage, but a captor of life, Arthn 



JUNE B. MARSHALL 

19 Lee Hill Road, Roslindale 

Art Club I, II, III, IV 
Drama Club I, II 
Literary Club I, II 
Science Club III, IV 

Elementary 

Straightforward . . . so concerned . . . do it 
now . . . feet on the ground . . . white linen. 




'52 



'52 




TERESE MARSHALL 



Elementarv 



219 Newbury St., Boston 



Avowedly emotional . . . constrained by conven- 
tion yet freed by self-discovery . . . resting on 
that upper plane . . . silent, subtle, singular 
Tess. 



george w. McCarthy 

40 Harwood St., West Roxbury 



Debating Club I 
Senior Play III 



Industrial 



Beaming, radiating, and twinkling simultane- 
ously . . . generous with time and talents . . . 
extremely good-natured. 



JEAN M. McCARTY 

2 Woodward Park St., Dorchester 

Music Club I, II, III 
Science Club I 
Drama Club I 

Kindergarten 

Generous motorist . . . a genial grin . . . 
welcome assistance . . . gay but genuine, Jean. 



AMELIA G. McCAULEY 

114 Park St., Dorchester 

Science Club I, II, III, IV 
Literary Club I, II 
Music Club I, II 

Elementary 

Timid you say . . . actually adamant . . . 
expanding mind . . . lull before the storm. 



JEAN F. McCORMACK 

19 Carroll St., West Roxbury 

Drama Club I, II 

Art Club I, II 

Literary Club I, II, III, IV 

Science Club I, II, III, IV 

Elementary 

A friendly glow . . . works so well . . . sweetly 
sedate . . . applauds humor . . . sunshine and 
white lilacs . , . enlightened, social, and refined. 



MARY I. McGOVERN 



Parkland Road, Brighton 



Drama Club I, 11 
French Club I 
Music Club II, III 

Elementary 

Full, rich laughter . . . magnetic affinity for a 
party . . . amazingly unruffled . . . stately yet 
sparkling, Mary. 




'52 



'52 




RICHARD J. McGUIRE 

41 Surrey St., Brighton 

Special Class 

Signs of earnestness . . . life's not a lark . . . 
quiet strength . . . flash of fantasy . . . de- 
pendable Richard. 



CLAIRE P. McMANUS 

15A Faulkland St., Brighto 



Drama Club I 
Music Club I, II, III 



Elementary 



So determined . 
smalt in stature . 
learn. 



calculus revisited . . . 
busy girl . . . quick to 



BERNADETTE M. MILLER 

63 Peter Parley Road, Jamaica Plain 

Music Club I, II, III 
Drama Club III, IV 
Science Club III, IV 
Lampas Staff, Section Editor 
Art Club III 

Elementary 

Impetuous like April showers . ■ ■ flurry of 
excitement . . . sweetly persuasive . . . good- 
ness of heart. 



THERESA L. MOLLOY 

40 Carruth St., Dorchester 

Drama Club I, II, III 
Science Club I, II, III 
Literary Club III, IV 

Elementary 

A sort of hesitation . . . elusive like lavender- 
scent . . . always a'flutter . . . simply sweet. 



MURIEL A. MOLONEY 



Drama Club I, II, III 
Science Club I, II, III 
Literary Club III 



46 Vale St., Roxbury 



Elementary 



That twinkle there . . . be serious . . . assign- 
ment accomplished . . . really personable. 
Youth, full of grace, force, fascination. 



JOAN M. MORRISSEY 

15 Prospect St., Charlestown 

Drama Club I 

Science Club II, III, IV 

Literary Club IV 

Vice President of Senior Class 



Elementary 



Not too tall . 
lace doilies . 



but explosive . 
very neat pack 



dainty like 
. . . bright 




'52 



'52 




ALICE L. MURPHY 



21 Wales Ave., Dorchester 



Welfare Aide II 
Drama Club III, IV 
Science Club IV 



Subdued emotion . . . locker-room ballads . . . 
one of those rare, casual scholars . . . poise 
indeed. 



KATHLEEN 



MURPHY 

11 Lathrop St., Brighton 



Literary Club III 
Music Club I 
Science Club II 

Elementary 

Wild and Irish . . . a continual pirouette . . 
constant amazement . . . out of breath . . 
bouncing Kathleen. 



VERONICA C. MURRAY 

12 Spinney St., West Roxbury 

Art Club I, III, IV 
Science Club II 
Drama Club III 
Literary Club IV 

Elementary 



A scented handkerchief . 
. . . roses and wine . 
Veronica. 



that Dresden look 
aloof yet alive, 



WILLIAM C. NASH 

45 Harvest St., Dorchester 

Music Club I, II, III, IV 

Special Class 

Sports again . . . a hearty chuckle . . . piano 
his forte . . . quite bemused . . . carefree Bill. 




VIRGINIA M. NEE 



126 Cushing Ave., Dorchester 



Music Club II 
Literary Club IV 

Elementary 

Always assurance . 
smart and stylish 
that dance. 




dangling earrings . . . 
. so capable . . . feet 



IRENE A. NICHOLS 



11 Follen St., Boston 



Science Club I, II, III, IV 
Drama Club, I, II, III, IV 

Lampas Staff, LiteraryEditor 

Elementary 

Matter of fact-ly . . . past and current . . . a 
little harmony . . . smoke and talk . . . vibrant 
and venturesome, Irene. 



'52 




'52 




GLORIA F. NOLAN 

36 St. Joseph St., Jamaica Plain 

Drama Club I, IV 

Science Club I 

Art Club I, II, III, IV 



Elementary 



Statuesque species . . 
charmingly helpful 
white roses. 



that model look . . 
. . bale out scene 



ERNESTINE T. O'BRIEN 

30 Woodbine St., Roxbury 

Music Club I, II, III, IV 

Science Club I, II, III, Vice President IV 

Art Club I 

Literary Club IV 



Constantly questioning . . . a quick side . . . 
glance at frivolity . . . convincingly uncon- 
cerned . . . the mad scientist, Ernestine. 



MARIE T. O'CONNELL 

24 Boynton Rd., Mediord 

Art Club I, Secretary II, III, IV 
Drama Club I, II, President III, IV 
President Sophomore Class 
Secretary Senior Class 

Elementary 

The spark, the fire . . . constant capability . . . 
a sincere cordiality . . . that crinkling of the 
eves . . . the girl for the job, Marie. 



AUDREY H. O'NEIL 

504 Park Drive, Boston 

Art Club I, II, III, IV 
Class Secretary II 
Drama Club III, IV 
S.G.A. Secretary III 
Lampas Editor-in-Chief 

Elementary 

Always efficient . . . sparkling blue eyes . . . 
whimsical comments . . . pink camellins. 



ALICE M. O'REGAN 



606 Cambridge St., Allston 

Music Club I, II 
Literary Club IV 
Science Club IV 
Welfare Club President IV 

Elementary 

The halo look . . . permanently polite . . . 
yellow gold . . . good and true. 



DANIEL V. PARMA 

62 Greenwich St., Dorchester 



Music Club II 
Debating Club II 



Industrial 



Cheerful countenance 
insistent persistence . 



. red suspenders 
three-alarm fire. 




'52 



'52 




HAZEL D. PITTERS 



11 '/ 2 SarfieldSt., Roxbury 



Art Club IV 

Music Club I 

Science Club I 

Lampas Staff, Art Editor IV 

Drama Club IV 



Mind of her own . . . social whirl . . . myriad 
thoughts . . . state your views . . . the artiste, 
Hazelle. 



MILDRED A. REGAN 



35 Green St., Charlestov 



Drama Club I, II, III, IV 
Science Club I, II, III, IV 
Literary Club I, II, III, IV 
Lampas Section-Editor 



Elementary 

Pen i 
mark 
soms. 



hand . . . delicate finesse . . . toe the 
. . Spartan endurance . . . apple hlos- 



JEREM1AH D. RYAN 

1 Gavin Way, South Boston 

Debating Club I 
Music Club HI 
Welfare Club Aide IV 

Industrial 

A quiet reserve . . . sincerely affable . . . an 
appreciative grin . . . considerate command. 



JEANNE M. SCANLAN 

11 Harbor View St., Dorchester 

Drama Club I 
Art Club II, III, IV 
Literary Club III 
Welfare Club Aide III 



A streak, a dash, a sudden stop . . . that turn of 
the phrase . . . a snap of the fingers . . . 
bright as rainbows, Jeanne. 



JOAN A. SCOLPONETI 

31 May St., Jamaica Plain 

Drama Club II 
Science Club II 
Art Club III, IV 
Lampas Section Editor 

Kindergarten 

The perpetual optimist . . . sports are second 
nature . . . a capacity for conviviality . . . 
Joan, the humorist. 



JOHN J. SHERRY, JR. 

180 BoylstonSt., Jamaica Plain 

Freshman Vice President 

Debating Club 

Self Government Association, Treasurer II 

Convention Delegate II, IV 

Senior Class President IV 

Industrial 

Repeatedly chosen . . . applied ideals . . . ab- 
sence of evasiveness . . . nothing too tedious 
. . . the way of the great. 




'32 




ANNETTE SIEGEL 



Drama Club I 
Literary Club I, II 



65 Hutchings St , Roxbury 



'52 




Breathless . . . clipped curls . . . jolly humor 
. . . such vitality . . . brief moments of 
quietude. 



JACK SINEW1TZ 



19 Allen St., Boston 



Basketball I, II, III 

Drama Club I, III 

Debating Club 

Welfare Club, Vice President III 

Industrial 

Name any sport . . . have to laugh . . . sus- 
piciously studious . . . a leaping wit. 



JOHN F. STEWART 




193 Ruskindale Rd. 


Mattapan 


Debating Club 




Industrial 




Serious again . . . what! hilarity? 


. . now I 


mean it . . . pounding the hooks 


. . a just 


balance. 





ANITA STONE 



53 Seldon St., Dorchester 



Literary Club I, II 
Science Club II, III, IV 

Elementary 

Impending inquiry . . . a constant determi- 
nation . . . time and effort . . . demon for 
discussion. 



ANNE C. SULLIVAN 

63 Wood lord St., Dorchester 

Secretary, Treasurer, Art Club II 
President Art Club III 
Drama Club I, II, III, IV 
Lampas Staff, Art Editor 
Section Councillor I 

Elementary 

Slim and svelte . . . attuned to the arts . . . a 
brisk awareness . . . venturing that step further 
. . . gregarious Anne. 



JEANNE A. SULLIVAN 

24 Day St., Jamaica Plain 

Drama Club I 
Debating Club II 

Elementary 

A quiet reserve . . . reportedly punctual . . . 
sometimes solemn . . . poplars and lilies. 




'52 



'52 




MARY T. SULLIVAN 



112 Elm St., Charlestown 

Drama Club I, II 
Debating Club I 

Elementary 

Bright eyes . . . not unnaturally curly hair 
. . . truly temper-less . . . a kind of glow . . . 
there are smiles. 



MARILYN SWIADON 

102 Callendar St., Dorchester 

Art Club I 

Drama Club III, IV 

Literary Club IV 

Elementary 

Laughing on the:' outside . . . knits yet knows 
. . . everything finis . . . from Hoffman to 
Sturdley . . . down to earth on a cloud. 



CLAIRE L. THORNTON 

14 Knowlton St., South Boston 

Art Club I, II 

Drama Club I, II, III, IV 

Music Club I 



Elementary 



t hazy golden glow . . . not exactly present . . . 
dropped stitch in time . . . world's a stage 

. . the voice. 



JOSEPHINE G. TROCCHIO 

1825 River St., Readville 

Music Club I, II 

Science Club I, II, III, IV 

Elementary 

The laugh that launched a million other laughs 
. . . a not so convincing seriousness . . . 
petulant Josie. 



ADELE M. TWOMEY 

5 Graham Terrace, West Roxbury 

Art Club I, II, III, IV 
Drama Club I, III 
Literary Club IV 
Welfare Aide II 

Elementary 

Intent upon living . . . at home on the range 
. . . a pinch cf whimsey . . . hostess extra- 
ordinaire^ Adele. 



ALMA VALOROS] 



11 East Newton St., Boston 



Music Club I, II, III, President IV 
Section Counsellor III 



Elementary 



Seriousness lined with gaiety . . . a purpose 
behind it all . . , music, the pathway to perma- 
nence . . . unquestionably competent, Alma. 




'52 



'52 




SARAH B. WALDRON 

10 Humboldt Ave., Roxbury 

Music Club 
Chalkdust 

Special Class 

Ah, such diligence . . . quiet but curious . . . 
unexpected inquiries . . . the over-all view . . . 
pale mignonette. 



BARBARA M. WALKER 

42 Walden St., Jamaica Plain 

Drama Club I, II, III, IV 
Art Club I, II, III, IV 
Lampas Staff, Art Editor 
Senior Play I, II 

Elementary 

Definitely dramatic . . . that stately swish . . . 
fancy for the arts . . . excitement and smoke 
. . . bright as footlights, Barbara. 



■ Howland St., Roxbury 



RUTH L. WEINER 

I 

Literary Club I, III, IV 

Elementary 



Composed spells . . . riotous intervals . . . 
exudes vitality . . . sun on cobblestones . . . 
the real thing. 



<z=^a'ctnet y 1/ Lenta, 



etnpet^ 



Atkins, Leatrice 
Barry, Barbara 
Brennan, Joan 
Carey, Florence 
Cashman, Paul 
Dougherty, Edward 
Greenfield, Mary 
Hartin, Beverly 
Kimball, Joan 
Levine, Diane 
Mallard, Bernadette 
Mandell, Barbara 



McCarthy, Margaret 
McKenney, Maryalice 
Mondlick, Joan 
O'Handley, Dulcie 
Parsons, Elaine 
Rauch, Carol 
Richmond, Alice 
Simmons, Miriam 
Thomson, Margaret 
Wall, Virginia 
Walton, Edward 




■{57} 



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Introducing 



.Activities 




A9?£ 




c^tudenL \^javetiti4tent <^4-ueciati 



President 

1st Vice-President 

2nd Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Faculty Advisers 



LUCILLE ELLIS 

MARJORIE COTTER 

ROBERT DONAHUE 

ADELE O'BRIEN 

VIRGINIA BOYLE 

DR. LYNCH 

dr. McCarthy 



The Student Government Association is an important organization at the 
Teachers College. Membership in it gives each student the opportunity to express his 
wishes concerning all matters and to participate in the direction of College affairs. Each 
section elects one representative to serve on the council which governs all extra-curricular 
activities. Not only is the Association active in school life at the College, but it also co-oper- 
ates with the New England Teacher Preparation Association in regional conventions and 
discussions. 

In the past year the Student Government Association sponsored many events 
on the college calendar. Such activities as the All-College Banquet and Dance, the Open 
House Night, the annual Christmas Party, and the Teachers College Night at the Pops 
helped to make this year a memorable one. 

Needless to say, the Student Government Association is an outstanding example 
of success in the democratic way of life. 



{64} 



LA^nJietata.Jiuate K^'tTicet* 





JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Sitting: Ruth Nebiker, Vice President; Leonard Scott, 

President 

Standing: Joseph Fillipone, Treasurer; Jean Phalen, 

Secretary 



SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

Sitting: Joan Morgan, Vice President; John Murphy, 
President 

Standing: Madeline Callahan, Secretary; Robert Hackett, 
Treasurer 




FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 

Sitting: Marianne McKenney, Vice President; Albert 

Beaton, President 

Standing: Leo Driscoll, Treasurer; Mary Benson, 

Secretary 




l/Velia'ce L^uta 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Faculty Adviser 



ALICE O'REGAN 

ROBERT BAKER 

JOHN CALABRO 

BARBARA LYNCH 

MISS BULGER 



The Welfare Club membership includes the faculty and the students of _ the 
College. Both groups share the responsibilities of this organization. Many opportunities 
arise during the school year for the Welfare Club to fulfill its purpose of serving others. 

Every year contributions are given to the Community Fund, the Cancer Drive, 
the Fund for Crippled Children, and also, the fund for the care of children confined to the 
Prendergast Preventorium. Activities of the club include the donation of Thanksgiving 
baskets, the distribution of toys at Christmas to children in hospitals, the making of annual 
Easter boxes for the Junior Red Cross, and participation in the Children's Clothing Crusade. 
From such experience the students are inspired to continue in their later lives the great work 
of service to their community. 

•106} 




c^A-tkletic c^4-Maciaticu 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Faculty Advisers 



TIMOTHY GALVIN 

RUTH SULLIVAN 

GEORGE ALLEN 

RONALD HOWLETT 

MISS ARMSTRONG 

MR. REGAN 

MR. SULLIVAN 



The Athletic Association sponsors many activities which are enthusiastically 
supported by the student body. The women students started the college year with volley 
ball, playing several intermural and interclass games. Soon after their basketball season got 
under way. The men began the year with intensive basketball practice. Under Mr. Regan's 
able coaching, the team, captained by Ronald Howlett, established an impressive 13-2 
record in their matches. With the coming of spring, interest turned to Softball, badminton, 
and baseball. 

Through participation in sports, the students develop physical fitness, a sense of 
fairplay, and an appreciation of teamwork. 



•{67} 




c^aence \^lub 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Faculty Adviser 



MILDRED MORRISSEY 

CLAIRE McGAFFIGAN 

JOAN JOHNSON 

ARTHUR FOSTER 

MISS O'DOHERTY 



The Science Club engages in many activities of social and educational value. 
At the monthly meetings held in the college there are motion pictures, discussions, and 
demonstrations. The traditional Christmas sale of greens and novelties makes possible 
the acquisition of science books for the MacRae Library. Field trips to nearby places of 
interest are enthusiastically supported by club members. Annual trips are made to Hough- 
ton's Pond, Nahant, and to Mr. Lamprey's home in Sudbury. Thus, in a happy informal 
manner, Science Club members increase their knowledge of science and develop a true love 
of nature. 



-{ 68 > 




t^U.Jtama k^Lup 



President 
Vice-President 
Treasurer 
Faculty Adviser 



MILDRED INGO 
DOROTHY DOWNEY 
PASQUALE LOCHIATTO 
MISS GAFFEY 



The Drama Club began its activities this year with a general meeting to 
which all interested students were invited. Prospective members registered, future plans 
were discussed, entertainment was presented, and refreshments were served. 

Soon afterwards rehearsals for the Christmas play were begun. The play, en- 
titled "The Nativity", is one of a cycle of four such plays that the club produces yearly. It 
was warmly received at the Christmas Assembly at the college. 

Besides affording ample opportunity for interested students to display their 
talents in the dramatic field, the club helps its members to learn the technical aspects' of 
theatrical production, such as make-up, costuming, staging, and management. 



{69} 




yVluuc k^Lup 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Faculty Adviser 



ALMA VALOROSI 

WILMA LANE 

JOSEPH A. De SARIO 

ARTHUR DONOVAN 

MISS E. A. O'BRIEN 



The Music Club with its delightful programs of song adds much to the success of 
college functions. The club performed at the Open House Night, the College Banquet, the 
Christmas Assembly, and at the Commencement exercises. It also presented the Messiah 
at the Teachers College and at Girls' Latin School. 

In addition to performing at our college functions it has represented Teachers 
College at various civic proceedings and on radio and television. The club participated in 
the Mayor's Inauguration at Symphony Hall and at the Governor's Reception at the Hall 
of Flags in the State House. It also rendered selections for the "I Am An American Day" 
celebration on the Boston Common and for the Centennial Radio Program of Teachers 
College. 

To the members of the club, music is an integral part of life. They hope that by 
their efforts they have reached out and instilled in the student body a desire to perpetuate 
their unwritten code: music for everyone, music for fun, music for inspiration, music forever. 



170} 




J—e K^cccle <zzy\ 



taucai^ 



Presidente 

Vice-President 

Secretaire 

Tresoriere 

Conseilere 



DOROTHY BORRIELLO 

HERBERT McCARTHY 

MARIA ZISI 

MARIE MORELLO 

MLLE GARTLAND 



Le Cercle Frangais donne aux etudiants et etudiantes du College l'occasion de se 
perfectionner dans la langue franchise et de se familiariser avec la culture et les coutumes de 
la belle France. Les membres du Cercle s'efforcent de parler francais aux seances, qui ont 
lieu le deuxieme lundi du mois. Le Cercle offre un programme tres varie: causeries, jeux, 
chansons, conferences faites par des invites, et films frangais. Cette annee, a la seance 
d'avril, les membres jouerent "La Dame de Bronze et le Monsieur de Cristal," comedie.de 
l'auteur contemporain Henri Duvernois. La representation tut vraiment admirable et attira 
des applaudissements chalerueux. Les reunions se terminent souvent par une demi-heure de 
conversation accompagnee d'une collation. 



{71} 




^J—iteta'cu K^lub 



1 



President 
Vice-President 
Secreatry 
Treasurer 

Faculty Adviser 



KATHLEEN HEISER 

MARY LANE 

KATHLEEN FITZPATRICK 

PATRICIA NAGLE 

MISS BRENNAN 



"Those who read are those who lead." 

Knowledge and entertainment reward those who belong to our "goodly fellow- 
ship". Our interests are both intellectual and social. We sponsor an annual tea in honor of 
the Freshman Class, we give a perforance at Christmas of "The Second Shepherds' 
Play", and we culminate our year's activities with a luncheon and a pilgrimage to a shrine of 
literary significance. In addition, our regular monthly meetings offer guest speakers, in- 
formal discussions, and literary films for the pleasure of those interested. 



■{72} 




cd-tt C^lub 



President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 

Faculty Adviser 



EDWARD O'GORMAN 

ADRIENNE BEATON 

BARBARA NORTON 

MR. BERTOLLI 



The Art Club, under the guidance and direction of its faculty adviser, Mr. 
Bertolli, is one of our most interesting and enjoyable organizations. The varied techniques 
learned in silk-screen painting, stencilling, charcoal drawing, pastels, and oil painting are ot 
great value to the members. The club participates in many of our college projects by pre- 
paring scenery and posters. Everyone should belong to the Art Club for, no matter how 
limited his talent may be he will derive pleasure from dabbling in art. 



•173} 




Cl 



Editor-in-Ckief 
CHARLES V. HICKEY 

Associate Editor's 

ROSEMARY CROSS MARY CHURCH 

CLARA GRANDOLPHI 

Sports Editors 

pierce McCarthy Elizabeth sullivan 

Art Editor 
RUTH NEBIKER 



Literary Editor 
PASQUALE LOCHIATTO 



Faculty Adviser 
DR. MADDEN 

Since its inception in 1948 as our college news sheet, Chalkdust has grown con- 
siderably in the scope of its coverage and in the number of its contributors. This growth is 
due in part to the reportorial and editorial energies of its staff. They have directed their at- 
tention to the production of worthwhile material and the encouragement of writers. 

Chalkdust is published five times in the course of a year. Many ambitious plans 
were attempted during the current year. A short story and poetry contest was established; 
a freshman orientation edition was published; and a new editorial policy of constructive 
criticism was instituted. These undertakings should insure Chalkdust's future as a potent 
force in student life at the Teachers College. 



{74} 




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Introducing 



Senior Week 




by John J. Sherry, Jr. 



This is the day upon which we observe a long honored ceremony. Today 
we shall plant a living symbol of the Class of 1952 of The Teachers College of the 
City of Boston. That symbol will be a tiny slip of ivy. This ceremony symbolizes 
the fact that we are young and are now going into the garden of our profession, 
education. It symbolizes our eagerness to grow in our chosen field and our ability 
to do so. It symbolizes, too, the fact that from now on our duties and obligations 
will always be entangled with the lives of others. 

Observation will show you that the hardy ivy vine is capable of surviving 
even if it is planted with the foulest of weeds. Not only does it survive, but it 
climbs to great heights and outshines the neighboring plant life. We, too, must 
outdo the small and evil things in this life and outshine them so that the children 
we guide will appreciate the finer things and so that they, too, will grow to out- 
shine the weeds in the garden of life. 

Neither rain, nor wind will make the ivy die. In spite of all it lives on. 
We must not lose faith, either, during the stormy days of life. We must accept 
what comes our way, make the best of it, and then come out like the ivy, above it 
all and bigger and better than ever. 

Each year the ivy develops new sprouts and it is through these sprouts 
that it grows. We, too, should be reaching out, but we must reach for knowledge. 
Only by improving upon what is within us can we really grow. We must not let our 
education come to a halt because we have received a degree. That is only one of 
the stepping stones toward further education and a better way of life. 

We of the graduating Class shall look forward to growing like our ivy 
vine. There is no end to what we can do in the years ahead — with, as all of 
nature's subjects, God as our guide. He will show us the way and the truth and 
the light. We must follow Him. 



^Late ^/-ruto'c 



i 



We entered with a BANG in September 
of 1948. We were by far the largest class to 
enter in a long time; we entered under a new 
president; and in addition, we brought with us, 
for the first time in T. C.'s history, MEN. 
Yes, we were unusual. When we arrived, some- 
thing new had been added. 

The first days were spent in a strange 
haze, as we got acquainted, accustomed, and 
acclimated to college life. Our sister class, the 
Juniors, did all they could to help us; but there 
was a method in their madness. They soon in- 
formed us that Freshman Week had arrived, 
and we were to act accordingly. The following 
days found us dressed as Indians, with tooth- 
brush feathers; as Babies, with short, upside- 
down skirts; and as Spirits of Summer, with 
carrots in our hair and Teabags on our ears. 
Unheard-of indignities were heaped upon our 
bowed, subdued shoulders. We carried their 
books (and were late for our own classes), re- 
cited the Alma Mater (on our knees), serenaded 
the MTA motormen ("Let Me Call You 
Sweetheart") until it seemed as if the parade of 
horrors would never stop. At last came Judg- 
ment Day, and we paid for our small mis- 
demeanors committed during the week. The 
punishments were many and varied, but we 
were rewarded for our perseverance that night 
by the Junior-Freshman Banquet. 

Things then settled down to normal, 
and we fell into the routine of classes. We 
opened puzzle boxes, studied circulation, de- 
veloped our oral tones by projecting them from 
windows to arouse the echoes in the courtyard 
(If ye are men . . .), and traced the develop- 
ment of democracy throughout the ages. In 
January we had our first taste of mid-year 
exams (oh, brother), but we managed to live 
through them. 

The men really began to take over. They 
were joined now by the Industrial Arts section, 



which, fresh from South Boston, became an 
integral part of T.C. Sports began to take on a 
new prestige. A basketball team was organized 
and a schedule set up. We were beginning to 
arrive. 

Then came March, and we inaugurated 
what was to become a trademark of our class. 
With singing commercials and Irish jigs, our 
radio broadcast on station WBTC advertized 
the first Shamrock Dance. This was a great 
success, and plans were immediately made for 
its continuation. 

During the April vacation some of the 
members of the class were with the Music Club 
when it sang so successfully at the Hotel 
Statler, before the convention of the Physical 
Education Teachers of the United States. 

Our Freshman year came to a close 
when we began our finals. When they were 
over, a few of the class decided that a celebra- 
tion was in order, so we spent a day at Nan- 
tasket, returning thoroughly roasted, our skin 
a nice, unpleasant red. We were, however, con- 
soled by the thought, "Next year we're 
Sophomores." 

Yes, we were Sophomores. We watched 
with knowing eyes (and sympathetic hearts, 
although we'd never admit it) the bewildered 
faces of the new batch of Freshmen. We took 
part in Freshman Week too, but this time as 
spectators. (What a relief!) 

Our first social event of the year was a 
dance in co-operation with the Seniors (the ter- 
rible Juniors of last year — What a difference 
a year makes.) In another Assembly program, 
to the tune of "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot", we 
extolled the advantages of attending this dance; 
and our efforts were rewarded by another very 
successful affair. 

In the meantime we were plunging into 
our classes. .That plunging is meant literally, 



{83} 



for each Friday the girls journeyed to the "Y" 
where they fast became swimming experts (if 
they didn't drown in the process). Our nights 
were spent in a maze of Beowulf, hydras, 
Spenserian stanzas, coleoptera, Chaucer, 
Shakespeare, diptera, hymenoptera, and a 
thousand, or maybe it was a million, others. 
Did we get confused! On top of this we dis- 
cussed the merits of square bathtubs (wonder 
if we heard right?) and had our first introduc- 
tion to Model School. 

In March, with more fanfare of Jigs 
and Reels, our second Shamrock Dance was an 
even bigger success than the first. It seemed 
that everyone "put on her lace, dolled up her 
face" and came. 

The rest of the year passed quietly — 
well, not too quietly — and we had our Junior 
year to look forward to. 

As our original lyrics went: — 
"From Freshmen to Sophomores and now we 

are Juniors, 
There isn't very far to go." 
Yes, we were nearing the top of the heap. This 
time we assigned the tortures to the Freshmen. 
They carried books tor us, opened doors for us, 
waited on us, and how we loved it. 

In December snowmen decorated T. C.'s 
halls advertising the Holly Hop, held in part- 
nership with the Sophs. "So we took our little 
darlings to the Holly Hop Dance", and more 
money was added to our treasury. 

We began our weekly visits to Model 
School, this time with a mind toward teaching 
a lesson on our own the following week. There 
were so many cases of shaky knees, butterflies 
in stomachs, and clammy hands, it's a wonder 
we lived to tell about it. 

Of course there was the Shamrock 
Dance again. This had become a tradition. 

Early in May each Junior was singing 
"We knew you were coming so we baked a 
cake." No, we were not cracking under the 
strain, we were just advertising our Cake Sale. 
Remember — Cakes baked with lead go to your 
head? Cakes of all descriptions and sizes were 



devoured with no effects that day, and did we 
make money! 

Then came the high point of the year, 
Junior Week. It opened on Sunday afternoon 
with the Mother-Daughter tea held at the 
Hampton Court. The next day in a courtyard 
ceremony, the class marched through the giant 
ring and were presented with the class rings. 
Wednesday night we attended the play given 
by the Dramatic Club, "George Washington 
Slept Here." Thursday night at the banquet at 
the Toll House, we dined sumptuously on 
broiled chicken — mmmm, delicious. Friday 
we rested and were well refreshed for the 
Junior Prom Saturday night at the Copley 
Plaza. And Junior week was over. 

The rest of the year was spent in pre- 
paring for the finals. Our brains reeled with 
names and places — Chuqicamata (is that 
spelled right?), winter solstice, John Newbery, 
McKee — and on, and on, and on. It finally 
came to an end (and it was nearly the end of 
some of us). 

Then we were Seniors. But all through 
the year we were only half there. That's right. 
Each semester half of our class journeyed forth 
to get first hand experience in the care and 
handling of a class. We never knew how many 
answers the children could give to what seemed 
to us to be a perfectly simple question. In the 
meantime the others struggled with a program 
that was out of this world. With barely time to 
draw a deep breath we rushed from Nature to 
American Lit., from Remedial Reading to 
Sociology, and from Music to Health, and 
back again. Like the music in the song, our 
heads went round and round. 

Somehow at the beginning of the year, 
we managed to get together long enough to 
have our cap and gown ceremony in which we 
officially received the mark of our exalted sta- 
tion in college life. It was suddenly called to our 
attention that we were the class to graduate in 
the 100th anniversary of the founding of T. C. 
As we said before, we always knew we were 
something special. 



{84 } 



In December a four class dance was 
held under the auspices of the S.G.A. This was 
held in the T. C. gym, and all the classes were 
well represented to help it succeed. 

Exams came, as they inevitably will, 
and the first semester of our Senior year was 
over. 

Those who had spent the first semester out 
in the schools now came back to take up again 
the routing of classes, while their places in the 
schools were taken by those who had been in 
the college for the first half. Those coming 
back immediately gave their assistance in the 
presenting of a Record Hop as a Centennial 
celebration. 

Time flew, as it always has done, and 
soon it was March again. The last Shamrock 
Dance was given, this time in Collins Hall. 
These dances will always stand out among 
our brightest memories of college life. 

In the meantime our brains were reeling. 
Added to the burden of classes was added the 
additional worry of MONEY. Money for the 
yearbook; money for the class gift; money for 
the banquet, for the outing, for the Prom, for 
Class Day; where and how could we get it? 
Somehow we managed. 

Senior Week came, our last activities of 



college life. There was another banquet at the 
Toll House, an outing at College Pond, a 
wonderful Tea with the Faculty, the Prom in 
the Princess Ballroom of the Hotel Somerset, 
Class Day, and the next Monday, GRADUA- 
TION. We finally made it. 

Our four-year stay at T. C. is over, but 
how can we ever forget it? Not to get senti- 
mental, we shall never forget it. There are so 
many things to remember. The first confused 
days, Freshman Week, the Shamrock Dances, 
the Christmas Assemblies, the performances of 
the Messiah, exams (we could forget exams?), 
the Dramatic Club's plays, swimming at the 
"Y", square dancing, our wonderful adver- 
tisement programs in the hall, Junior week, the 
Junior Prom, our lessons at Model School, our 
first experiences in the regular classrooms, our 
first attempts at drawing elephants (?), 
Senior Week, Commencement, Graduation — 
No, we won't forget — nor will we be forgotten. 

We were worth waiting one hundred 
years to see. And in the year 2052 we plan to 
lean over the bar of Heaven and see if the 200- 
year class at Boston Teachers College measures 
up to the standards that we set. The bloom on a 
century plant simply has to be something 
special. 

Margaret Ambrose 



4 85} 



C^tf 



t 



'Education tor Service' 



One hundred years of service to the 
school children of America is the accomplish- 
ment of our beloved Alma Mater. Our school 
motto "Education For Service" has charac- 
terized the work of those who have gone before 
us, and we hope it will continue to be carried on 
in the work of the present graduating class. 

During the past four years we have 
learned many principles of education. Among 
the ones uppermost in our minds are the 
theory of the whole child; the Herbartian 
steps; the core curriculum; unitary teaching; 
doctrine of individual needs and differences; 
outcomes of learning. 

At first these phrases were a meaning- 
less hodgepodge of facts all nicely written about 
in our textbooks on education. Gradually these 
phrases are assuming a pattern and order. As 
we apply these principles to teaching situa- 
tions, they will become more meaningful to us. 

The Class of 1952 looks forward with 
eagerness and pleasure to teaching; yet realiz- 
ing the responsibilities facing us, we also look 
forward with apprehension. We ask ourselves, 
"Are we ready to cast off the role of passive 
learner and assume the important one of 
director and guide?" This feeling of inade- 
quacy stems partly from our inexperience and 
also from the chaotic state of the world today. 
Our generation has often been spoken of as 
one without hope. It has been said that we can- 
not look forward to the future, but that we can 
only cope day-by-day with the problems facing 
us. 

As beginning teachers, we do not have 
this feeling of despair. We do not feel that the 
orderly pattern of the world has disintegrated. 
Rather, we hope that we are qualified to lead 
the young minds placed within our care into 
channels that are pure and wholesome. We look 
forward to our positions next fall with eager- 
ness and a sense of challenge. 

Yes, the role we are to play is an im- 



portant one. We must help to bring about order 
from this chaos by directing the children of 
America. It is we who must help to create the 
citizens who will hold steadfast the principles 
so necessary for a decent and worthy way of life. 

In order to accomplish this task of 
teaching "the whole child" the teacher her- 
self must be a well-rounded personality. In our 
years of study, we have come to realize that the 
teacher must possess subtle insights, compli- 
cated skills, wide knowledge, and a pleasing 
personality. Thus we have been led to see that 
teaching is not an easy task. Yet, we must not 
feel that our problems are original or novel. 
Each preceding class has also had problems to 
face and has met them squarely. It was Edison 
who said: "Success is 99% perspiration and 1% 
inspiration." This simple yet effective quota- 
tion can be applied to our work in the teaching 
profession. 

The true teacher by her zeal, her en- 
couragement, her devotion can be a model for 
her pupils. Our methods and efforts may often 
seem unrewarding. Yet it is only by constant 
study, experimentation, and reorganization 
that we can improve our teaching so that it at 
last becomes fruitful. We shall find joy in 
guiding the faltering footsteps of a child and 
great satisfaction in knowing we have set some- 
one on the right path in life. We must take our 
places in the field of education knowing that 
the task before us is an arduous one. We must 
meet the challenge bravely, and we must prove 
ourselves worthy to proclaim — "Yes, I am a 
teacher." 

As our parting wish, we recall the words 
of our beloved Alma Mater: 

"Mother, grant us thy passion 

for service, that we 
May lead youth with its ardor 
to seek for the light." 

Claire Lawlor 
Patricia Diskin Rose 



{86} 



<z?4- yyiock {U'cvvkecu 



INTRODUCTION: 

You are about to peruse a farcical 
prophecy, written by two radicals who do not 
believe in prophecies. Not content with voicing 
our unbelief orally, we have transferred to 
print, in the form of a duo-soliloquy, our scorn 
of the almost-never-correct, totally trite, usu- 
ally space-wasting prophecy. This has been ac- 
complished in part by accumulating the many 
mundane, rather trite expressions found in 
ordinary prophecies and distorting them to an 
immense degree. 

We hope, therefore, that the reader will 
recall the imaginative tone of our class so that 
he may probe the depths and realize the mean- 
ings of expressions purposely left unexpressed. 



Reading in the Daily Shirker- that the 
Russians' latest invention, the Stalinochine, a 
remarkable time machine, had been stolen by 
leading scientists, we, with our typical thirst 
for knowledge, decided to examine the famous 
metallic intricacy on display. Gaining admis- 
sion through a door just prior to closing time, 
we proceeded to the mausoleum in question. 

There it stood! The guards having be- 
gun closing procedures, we ventured further 
into the unknown. We entered the machine. As 
misery would have it, we turned in time to see 
the rusty, rectangular door jerk shut. 

Since the wheel of fortune would have it 
that we were projected into such a favorable 
situation, why not take advantage of it, now? 

Quickly turning the dial marked 'Year- 
ovitch' to 2052 and the dial marked 'Where- 
ovitch' to Planet Elmsville in the Molar 
System, a part of the Waleco Way Galaxy, we 
sank back into plush arm chairs provided es- 
pecially for the occasion, firmly grasped an 
overflowing box of popcorn, and waited. 

A weird whirr wound around the ma- 
chine; the picture cleared and we could discern 
that the origin of the weird whirr was — what ! ! 
a wax-papered space ship trailing a banner 
which proclaimed, "Try Moe's Molar Mocca- 
sins — Jet Propelled to Insure Your Flying 
Safety — Don't Be Slow, See Moe." 



We watched with Wide-Eyed Wonder 
(our recently-discovered stowaway), waiting 
for the ship to plummet to a swiftly-declining 
declivity, for looming inevitably beneath its 
frenzied fall was its destiny, a chic cherry- 
chartreuse, vermilionviolet, hectically-hued 
sphere. 

We waited with Bated Breath, sitting on 
Pins and Needles (more stow-aways), for the 
ill-fated ship to smash into smitheroons; 1 only 
to find that when the irresistible object met the 
immovable force, the previously-designated ob- 
ject bounced twenty million leagues into the 
seriously-cumulated clouds. For three weeks 
we sat watching the bouncing; at last the ship 
settled. 

From such an exhibition of bouncing we 
realized that Elmsville was no run-of-the-mill 
planet, but a helium-heavy, happily-hued rub- 
ber ball. 

On our corrugated-cardboard screen we 
were to witness the most unbelievable events 
ever to be denied. We leave it to the reader's 
discretion, imagination, and sanity, however, 
to evolve for himself an unbiased, unbalanced 
opinion. 

The door of the space ship was flung 
open by unseen hands. Out bounced two 
tussled, terrified, trembling, wretched ad- 
venturers, who advanced by leaps and bounds 
to the foreground of the screen. Those scarlet 
sneakers looked familiar; could it be??? It 
was ! — We — the both of us — together ! 

Putting our respective heads together in 
the Stalinochine on Planet Earth, we came to 
realize that this remarkable time machine was 
revealing our status quo in the year 2052 on 
the planet, Elmsville. We watched ourselves 
proceed down Eraser Avenue with our native 
guide, Hevea, who garrulously summed up the 
outstanding features of the planet. He revealed 
that there were many tourists at this time of 
year because the rubber trees were now in 
bloom with kaleidoscopically-colored rubber 
bands; of special interest was Tire Grove 
National Park and quaint old Overshoe Lane. 

'To the unphilologicaly-inclined laymen: Smitheroons: 
minute particles o( smithereens. 



•{87} 



Hevea warned us that pins were banned 
on Elmsville, since a careless native had one 
day been the cause of the deflation of the 
planet, and only a quick supply of hot air 
rushed up from earth saved the day on Elms- 
ville. 

We stopped to quench our thirst at 
Sidewalk Cafe, where we enjoyed a cool aperi- 
tif of the national drink, lemon latexade. At a 
nearby table an irate customer was complain- 
ing that his overdone rubber tasted too much 
like steak. Hevea pointed out a famous land- 
mark situated across the street from the cafe, a 
gymnasium, which was noted for its relaxing 
erasure baths. 2 

The quietude of the atmosphere was 
pierced by an authoritative voice issuing from a 
short wave radio within the cafe. The voice 
proclaimed, "Late bulletins fix the position of 
Planet Elmsville 20° southwest of its most re- 
cent position. So that's the way the ball 
bounces." 

Presently Hevea conducted us to our 
pre-designated destination, Elmsville Ele- 
mentary School, where delegates from every 
conceivable planet from every conceivable 
galaxy had gathered to honor the Code of 
Education which had been formulated on, as 
they called it, the obscure and distant planet, 
Earth, during the past hundred years by a 
group of industrious, eminent educators, for 
the most part from the halls of The Teachers 
College of the City of Boston, the Class of 1952 
having been seized with an inspirational 
frenzy at one moment. This Code of Education 
had been worked out to such a degree of per- 
fection that every child educated under its pre- 
cepts thus far had performed to his highest 
capacity. 

When we expressed our curiosity con- 
cerning the school itself, Hevea volunteered to 
conduct us on a force de tour of the establish- 
ment, erstwhile pointing out the special fea- 
tures of interest along the way. Approaching 
the first door on our left, we were surprised to 
see that there was no knob on it. Hevea ex- 
plained that this was unnecessary since the 
school had doors you could walk through. 
Having entered quickly and quietly, we ap- 
proached the blackboard, which had a strange 
cleansing device. A spray was attached to the 
top and a windshield wiper fastened to the 
chalk-ledge. Because of this, children no longer 

2 The populous take advantage of natural resources and 
erase themselves when cleansing is necessary. 



asked the teacher if they could wash the board 
on Friday afternoon. 

Our next point of interest was the 
Music Salon, where, Hevea informed us, the 
children were taught two-part harmony, one 
person singing two parts at one time. Thus a 
monotone could sing only one part at a time, 
and a quartet consisted of two people. 

We then proceeded to another class- 
room, where Hevea demonstrated an unusual 
type of book which read itself aloud in beautiful 
tones when plugged in. Hevea explained to us 
that the term, "non-reader," was now applied 
to a book which could not read because of a 
burned-out plug. 

Arriving back at the reception room, we 
graciously received the plaudits and congratu- 
lations of all present for those we represented. 
Realizing that the 5:40 Space Ship was de- 
parting for points west, we quickly donned a 
pair of Moe's Molar Moccasins and hastened 
to the ship. 

A weird whirr wound around the 
Stalinochine on planet Earth; the picture 
blurred and faded away. We realized that the 
origin of the weird whirr was a pneumatic drill 
piercing the knob-covered walls of the Stalino- 
chine. A filtered ray of light inched its way into 
the unknown; the vaulted door jerked open, 
and we were free! 

Bewildered officials of the mausoleum 
fired a barrage of questions at us, which we 
artfully eluded. Having repeated all which we 
have thus narrated, we could see the gleam of 
mistrust and misapprehension in the eyes of our 
listeners, a gleam which we were to see many 
times repeated in the eyes of all those who 
heard our story. 

But as they scoff and ridicule us at every 
turn, we unremittingly search for the only wit- 
nesses besides ourselves to such a colossal ex- 
travaganza, Wide-Eyed Wonder, Bated Breath, 
and Pins and Needles. 

We wait for the day when the aforesaid 
inspirational frenzy takes hold of the class of 
1952 to set off the chain of events leading to the 
perfection of all educational codes and prin- 
ciples. 

That such an event will take place, we 
know; in the meantime, we wait. 

Clara Grandolfi 
Rosemary Cross 



{88} 



CLu 1/Uiii 



"Be Ours The Fair Vision" 

We, the Graduating Class of 1952, assume the more serious task of leaving to our 
friends a worthwhile remembrance, thus suspending an exhausted custom whereby various 
and sundry paraphernalia are willed to undergraduates and anon, like worthless trinkets, 
forgotten. 

Being a visionary class, and cherishing that vision above all other class ideals, we 
wish to share with you a portion of that vision which will serve you steadfastly through 
the years. 

Why bequeath such a vague, intangible thing? Imaginative souls will see no paradox 
in the explanation that it is the unreal that is real and the actual which is nothing: the 
boundless which is exact and the material which is void. On such a premise rests the argu- 
ment of this endeavor. 

Why the necessity? The way of the teacher is not easy. Of all the evils which may 
arise to deaden the ardor of aspiring neophytes such as we, most deadly are the toxins from 
over-exerted routinism and systematization. That these methods are necessary in peda- 
gogical endeavors cannot be denied; however, their very necessity too often leads to an over- 
use which usurps the inspirational force of the teacher. Concession to routine is catastrophic 
to the teacher. The antidote . . .? 

Our vision is a broad valley through which flow the quiet waters of earnest contem- 
plation. It slopes upward to towering mountains of fulfillment. It blooms with the fruit of 
good intentions. It is radiant with the sunlight of happiness. It is blessed with the spirit of 
God. Its law is aspiration; its school teaches idealization; its emblem is perfection; its 
citizen is the soul. 

Such a valley is yours to roam. The road leads inward: through the soul. When rou- 
tine becomes stifling; reaction, automatic; the toys of the world, empty, escape to the valley 
of vision to liberate your bound intellect and free your shackled soul. Drink of its waters, 
eat of its fruit, climb its towers, bask in its sunlight, meet its Ruler, — and find peace. 

We hope that the inevitable grapple with materialistic enticements and set routine 
will not find you by-passing our valley of vision; that the inspiration and aspiration of your 
college days will forever live in that timeless vale; that lengthening of life will not mean 
shortening of perception. 

And don't ever stop your dreaming! Though your vision be elusive, hold firm to it. 
If you lose it — ? "Where there is no vision, the people perish," warns our College Hymn, 
for it is the spirit that lives; all else is nothing. 

Clara Grandolfi 



L^la^ <z~>(wa — 1932 



1. 

Alma Mater, praise to thee! 
Thine be glory constantly. 
Ever mindful of thy care^ 
Thou hast shown us beauties rare. 

CHORUS 

Lift high our voices as we sing 
May thy praises ever ring 
With heartfelt love and loyalty 
And echo through eternity. 



Alma Mater, ever free 

Ours the joy to honor thee. 

Service, thy eternal light, 

Shall lead us upward to thy height 

CHORUS 

3. 

As years go by, we'll cherish dear 
The memories fond of days spent here; 
Of knowledge sound and friendships true, 
Whate'er we have, we have from you. 

CHORUS 

Words, Rita Crowley 
Alma Valorosi 

Music, Margaret Ambrose 



{ no } 



^late lUc 



cent 



If but one life becomes through mine 
More sanctified and more sublime, 
One mind more eager to be free, 
Young hands to work more joyously, 
My work will be worth while. 

If but one soul I help to grow 
With wisdom's inner sight, to know 
The beauty and the joy untold 
That a well ordered life can hold, 
My work will be worth while. 

To take the innocence of youth 
And guide it in the way of truth, 
To fashion it with patient care 
The wonder of this world to share, 
Will make my work worth while. 



Irene Nichols 



{01} 



WF^ 





s^VvO 



.j&g" 









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cz^>eiti^t l/Veek (f-'tva 



tarn 



GENERAL CHAIRMAN: 



FACULTY ADVISERS: 



Jeanne Scanlan 



Miss B. Eaton 
Mr. G. Aherne 

BACCALAUREATE ADDRESS Monday, June 2, 1952 

Doctor Looney 

Chairmen 
Audrey O'Neil 
Myron Boyajian 

FACULTY TEA Tuesday, June 3, 1952 

Chairman, Patricia Connolly 

CLASS OUTING Wednesday, June 4, 1952 

Chairman, George McCarthy 

CLASS BANQUET Thursday, June 5, 1952 

Chairman, Timothy Galvin Toll House 



SENIOR PROM 



Friday, June 6, 1952 
Chairmen Somerset Hotel 

Veronica Murray 
Mildred Regan 



CLASS DAY Saturday, June 7, 1952 

Chairman, Alma Valorosi 



COMMENCEMENT 



Monday, June 9, 1952 



{ 9G } 



pat 



Mr. & Mrs. George F. Aherne 
Mr. George Allen 
Mr. & Mrs. William E. Ambrose 
Anonymous 

Miss M. Doris Armstrong 
Mr. & Mrs. J. A. Baglione 
Mr. Robert F. Baker 
Miss Katherine E. Ban- 
Mr. Louis E. Battaglia 
Mr. & Mrs. Albert E. Beaton 
Miss Mary Benson 
Mr. & Mrs. Harry Berger 
Miss Catherine Berry 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert C. Bertazonni 
Mr. Robert L. Bertolli 
Miss Gloria Bodo 
Mr. John Michael Bonanno 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles W. Bopp 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles Borriello 
Mr. & Mrs. N. Boyajian 
Mr. & Mrs. Bernard Brawley 
Miss A. Frances Brennan 
Miss Ruth A. Bulger 
Dr. Franes Burnce 
Mr. & Mrs. William J. Burns 
Mr. Paul Callanan 
Mrs. Hector Campbell 
Miss Angela M. Cannata 
Mr. Albert J. Carey 
Miss Sara Carey 
Miss Alice C. Chisholm 
Mr. & Mrs. Arthur A. Church 
Mrs. Anthony Colletta 
Miss 'Debbie' Coletta 
Mr. Gilbert Coletta 
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Colleran 
Dr. & Mrs. John E. Collins 
Mrs. John Connolly 
Mr. & Mrs. James E. Cotter 
Dr. & Mrs. Charles Coyle 
Mr. John A. Coyle 
Miss Mary E. Coyle 
Mr. & Mrs. William F. Cram 
Mr. John F. Creamer 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert Creamer 
Mr. Vincent A. Cristiani 



tan^ 



Mrs. Margaret C. Crowley 

Mr. Donald J. Cusack 

Miss Dorothy A. Damato 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael Dello Russo 

Mr. Joseph A. DeSario 

Mr. & Mrs. John Diskin 

Mr. William A. Dolan 

Miss Mary C. Donahue 

Mr. Robert E. Donahue 

Mr. John S. Donoghue 

Miss Lulu A. Donovan 

Mr. Herbert A. Drew 

Miss Alice Driscoll 

Mr. & Mrs. Leo C. Driscoll 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph P. Duffy 

Miss Lillian Duggleby 

Mrs. Margaret Duggleby 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas F. Dungan 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph O. Duseau 

Miss Beatrice P. Eaton 

Miss Margaret F. Ennis 

Freshman 2 

Freshman 8 

Mr. & Mrs. Farrah G. Farrah 

Miss Marie I. Farrell 

Miss Mary E. Ferrari 

Miss Eloise R. Fitzgerald 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter J. Fitzgerald 

Mrs. Winifred Fitzpatrick 

Mr. John J. Fox 

Mr. & Mrs. Fred Frankel 

Mr. & Mrs. David Freedman 

Miss M. Margaret Gaffey 

Miss Edith M. Gartland 

Miss Jean Anne Geary 

Mr. & Mrs. John P. Geary 

Mr. John P. Geary, Jr. 

Mr. Charles D. Gildea 

Miss F. Winifred Given 

Mr. & Mrs. John C. Gray 

Mr. John A. Grillo, Jr. 

Miss Joan F. Hayes 

Miss Kathleen Heiser 

Miss Marion R. Herzig 

Mrs. M. A. Hession 

Mr. Charles Hickey 



Miss Margaret A. Holzman 

Miss Sona Hovagimian 

Mr. & Mrs. Bernard Hughes 

Junior 4 

Miss Miriam Kallen 

Miss Rose Mary A. Keiran 

Miss Pauline H. Kelley 

Mr. & Mrs. William Kent 

Mr. Paul M. Kincade 

Mr. John G. Lane, Jr. 

Mr. & Mrs. James Lawlor 

Mr. Morton S. Lederman 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph M. Lee 

Mr. George J. Lerra 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph M. Levi 

Miss Anna Lewdansky 

Mr. & Mrs. C. S. Lewis 

Dr. & Mrs. William F. Looney 

Miss Barbara Lydon 

Miss Frances T. Lynch 

Dr. Mary E. Lynch 

Mr. Edward P. Mabardi 

Dr. Regina D. Madden 

Mr. Michael R. Maher 

Mr. & Mrs. George C. Maraggia 

Mr. Arthur Mark 

Mrs. Eva Markovitz 

Miss Zelda Markovitz 

Dr. William H. Marnell 

Miss Clare L. Martell 

Miss Ann E. McCarthy 

Dr. & Mrs. Francis W. McCarthy 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. McCarthy 

Miss Dore E. McCarty 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis X. McCarty 

Mr. Fank J. McCarty 

Miss Margaret L. McCarty 

Mr. & Mrs. T. F. McGovern 

Mr. Neil J. Mclntire 

Mr. & Mrs. A. J. Miller 

Mr. Edward J. Miller 

Mr. & Mrs. M. J. Miller 

Miss Mary Miller 

Miss Elaine T. Millett 

Mr. & Mrs. Philip C. Moloney 

Miss Mildred Morrison 

Miss Joan Morrissey 

Miss Clare M. Murray 

Mr. Alexander Nash 

Miss Carolyn Nash 



Miss Virginia Nee 

Mrs. Jessie A. Nichols 

Mr. Harvey Novack 

Mr. John Novicki 

Mr. & Mrs. Denis A. O'Brien 

Miss Elizabeth A. O'Brien 

Mr. & Mrs. William B. O'Brien 

Miss Mary T. O'Connell 

Mr. Philip P. A. O'Connell 

Miss Elizabeth A. O'Doherty 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward F. O'Neil 

Mr. & Mrs. Hugh H. O'Reagan 

Mr. & Mrs. Hubert J. Powderly 

Miss Margaret G. Quirk 

Mr. M. Harvey Read 

Mr. William Ready 

Mr. & Mrs. Herbert G. Regan 

Dr. James E. Reilly 

Mr. & Mrs. Michael F. Roche 

Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence H. Rose 

Miss Ruth Rutman 

Mr. & Mrs. J. D. Ryan 

Mr. & Mrs. James D. Ryan 

Miss Margaret M. Sallaway 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph H. Scolponeti 

Mr. David A. Sill 

Mr. & Mrs. B. Sinewitz 

Sophomore 7 

Sophomore 8 

Mr. John J. Staples 

Mr. & Mrs. John Stewart 

Mr. Sydney R. Stoller 

Mr. D. Bradley Sullivan, Jr. 

Mr. James P. Sullivan 

Miss Mary T. Sullivan 

Miss Eileen E. Sweeney 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry L. Tafe 

Mrs. Mary Thornton 

Miss M. Patricia Tracy 

Miss Caroline J. Trommer 

Mr. Richard S. Tyrell 

Miss Claire T. Vara 

Miss Astrid Varnay 

Miss Ann M. Walsh 

Miss Clare M. Walsh 

Mrs. Evelyn Walsh 

Mr. & Mrs. Nathan Weiner 

Mr. & Mrs. A. H. Williamson 

Mr. Edward A. Zaleskas 



THE 

BOSTON 
TEACHERS' 
ALLIANCE 



An organization open to all teachers in the 
Public Schools of Boston 



<S^> 



114 STATE STREET 
LAfavette 3-4270 



PArkway 7-5100 



Scholastic Jewelers 

INCORPORATED 



Official Jeweler 
Class of 1952 



JOHN F. LYNCH 

PRESIDENT 



.5174-78 WASHINGTON STREET 
BOSTON 



Warren Kay Vantine Studio, Inc. 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER 

TO 

THE 1952 LAMPAS 



132 Boylston Street .'. Boston, Mass. 



Compliments of 

THE SELF-GOVERNMENT 
ASSOCIATION 



Compliments of 

THE JUNIOR CLASS 



Compliments of 

THE SOPHOMORE CLASS 



GREEN - FREEDMAN 


Compliments of 


BAKING CO., INC. 




Fine Cakes and Pastries 


McKEON & CASBY 


Best Bread Baked 


OUR CATERERS 


OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 

390 Harrison Ave. Boston, Mass. 
DE 8-7900 


1106-1110 Boylston St. 
Boston, Mass. 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 


CHALKDUST 


TEACHERS CLUB 









Compliments of 

THE LITERARY CLUB 


Compliments of 

THE SCIENCE CLUB 


Compliments of 

THE MUSIC CLUB 


Compliments of 

THE DRAMA CLUB 


Compliments of 

LE CERCLE FRANCAIS 


Compliments of 

THE ART CLUB 



Congratulations, Class of 1952 
from 

The Boston Teachers Union Local 66 

American Federation of Teachers (A. F. of L.) 



affiliated with : 
The Massachusetts Federation of Labor 120 Boylston Street, 

The Massachusetts State Branch of the Boston, Mass. 

American Federation of Teachers Room 811 

The Boston Central Labor Union 



Compliments of the 

BOSTON NORMAL SCHOOL 
and 
TEACHERS COLLEGE ASSOCIATION 



Compliments of the 

BOSTON TEACHERS CLUB 

Whose motto is: 
It is not necessary that we should all 



think alike, but we should all think. 



117 Hotel Bellevue 
Beacon Street, Boston 



Tel. BEacon 2-0706 

THOMASIAN 
Jewelry - Inc. 

646A Huntington Ave. Boston 15, Mass. 

Corner Longwood Ave. 


Res.: ASP. 9646 Shop: ASP. 1-206 
Say it with Flowers 

Evergreen Flower Shoppe 

In the Center of Hospitals 
Floirers for all Occasions 

Flowers Delivered and Telegraphed Anywhere 

712 Huntington Avenue Boston, Mass. 


Compliments of 

VICE PRINCIPALS CLUB 
OF BOSTON 

To the Graduating Class, 1952 


AMERICAN HUMANE 
EDUCATION SOCIETY 

Affiliated with Angell Animal Hospital 
180 Longwood Ave. Boston 15, Mass. 

Leaders and children are invited for instruction 

and animal films. Competent teacdiers available 

for animal and nature classroom study. 

Tel. Mr. Pollard LO 6-6100 


Compliments of 

DINI'S SEA GRILL 

94 Tremont Street Boston 8, Mass. 


Compliments of 

HICKOX SCHOOL 


JOHN S. DOOLEY 

Photographer 
43 Roslin St. Dorchester 24, Mass. 


JOHN R. SAWYER, Phm. D. 

Dispensing Chemist 
367 Centre Street Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Tel. JA '2-3690 


Compliments of 

LONGWOOD RESTAURANT 


FERMOYLE DRUG, Inc. 

W. E. L. J. Fermoyle, Ph. . 

J. 15. Sullivan, Reg. Pharm 

722 Huntington Ave. Boston, Mass. 

Tel. BE '2-0863 



CLOTHING 



Compliments of 

EDWARD F. P. BURNS, INC. 



100 Summer Street 



RENTAL SERVICE 



Tel. LO 6-9000 



HARVARD DRUG CO., INC. 

F. DUEMMLING, B. S., Ph. C, Mgr. 



644 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 



BOSTON, MASS 



PArkway 7-8061 

BETTE BEAUTY SHOP 

By Appointment 
64 Corinth St. Roslindale, Mass. 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 
F6 


SO 1 


Compliments of 
Boston Elementary Teachers Club 


TELEVISION A-l RADIO 

Sales — Service — Installation 
on all makes 
1925 Washington Street Roxbury, Mass. 


Compliments of 
F 10 


Compliment* of 

J. L. HAMMETT CO. 

School Supplies 
10 Beacon St. Boston, Mass. 



The 
Boston Teachers College Newman Club 

offers Catholic Students 

RELIGIOUS, INTELLECTUAL, SOCIAL 
PROGRAM 

• Retreats • Lectures • Dances 

• Holy Hours • Discussions • Ski Trips 

• Breakfasts • Literature • Outings 



MEETINGS: Newman Center, 68 St. Stephens Street, Boston 
1st and 3rd Wednesdays each month 

DIRECTOR: Father Leo Conlin, C.S.P. 

70 St. Stephen St. .-. Tel. CO 6 2620 



Compliments of 



THE FRESHMAN CLASS 



Compliments of 




J 3 


THE WELFARE CLUB 




Compliments of 




SO 2 




Compliments of 


Compliments of 


SO 6 


F4 


Compliments of 




THE HILLEL FOUNDATION 


Compliments of 


at 
BOSTON TEACHERS COLLEGE 


THE SENIOR CLASS 



SHERRY MOTORS INC. 

DE SOTO — PLYMOUTH 
Sales & Service 

1710 CENTRE ST. 
WEST ROXBURY, MASS. 



Compliments of the 



Weary 



J-CLmpcL6 -~>te/jn 



-fV UedtboOlC created and produced 
by our skilled craftsmen is always 
appreciated for the excellence of its 
design and quality of workmanship. 



ONE SIXTY WARREN STREET 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

Sipeciauiti In SickooL and LLoLLeqe /-'uoLlcationi